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Phillipe Kenny

Modesto, CA, United States

Feb 13 at 09:59 AM

Gregor Are you sure you use the 3B? I just checked and these are the Codes: B = 5 micronT = 0.5 micronA = 0.2 micron

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Feb 13 at 09:49 AM

Gregor Awesome! Thanks for that. So far, pretty intuitive and logical stuff. I tried folding the bag over after hearing about that on your deep dive video and it was still drying out, although that doesn't mean it didn't decrease the drying, I just didn't observe it carefully enough. The specifics parameters that you have tried and tested are very helpful. When the literature states the mycelium tolerates a certain ppm, (over 5kppm), I'm assuming that it is inside the bag so you want to keep it significantly lower in the room, as you do.

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Feb 05 at 02:55 PM

So far I captured 1 erinaceus, 1 coralloides and 1 americanus (I believe). Got them on spawn now and excited to fruit my first wild Hericiums. Any tips on substrate, etc. are greatly appreciated.

Feb 05 at 02:55 PM

So far I captured 1 erinaceus, 1 coralloides and 1 americanus (I believe). Got them on spawn now and excited to fruit my first wild Hericiums. Any tips on substrate, etc. are greatly appreciated.

Feb 05 at 02:26 PM

BenJamin Harderhmm my concern with this one is that you can't position the bag in a way that it is still receiving HEPA air up to the point of sealing. In other words, the sealer is going to block laminar flow clean air and potentially cause dirty air to get in the bag. I guess if you hold the bag completely shut as you stick it in the sealer it could work. I've never used one of these style sealers

Posted

Feb 05 at 02:23 PM

Deriving from my last post about Stroma, there is a question that's been bugging me for a while: What is the ideal CO2 levels for a Spawn incubation room? And the questions behind it: what is the correlation/ differential between the CO2 concentration inside the bag compared to the room (has anyone tested this)? What are the thermodynamics going on between temperature and filter patch gas exchange.

And going off of that, how does humidity/temp/ FAE affect the moisture inside the bag. I often see the grain on the surface of my spawn drying (I'm assuming) because it doesn't get colonized.

If anyone has any resources to point me to, I'd graetly appreciate it.

Feb 05 at 02:16 PM

Phillipe Kenny I'm guessing the heat accelerated the metabolic rate of the oysters, especially as they became thick and that cause that spike in CO2

Feb 05 at 02:14 PM

Thanks for such a timely and complete response and orientation. Once you open the bag and break up the "tumor" growth, it has a distinct smell as well, right?Another factor which I updated on my post is that the CO2 level increases room 500ppm to 1300 ppm, not sure for how many days because I wasn't tracking. I wonder if that was a major cause? 

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Posted

Feb 01 at 10:51 AM

STROMA? 

[Update: CO2 levels also increase from about 500 to 1300. Maybe that was a contributor? 

Is this stroma? Refer to the videos in this link please:

https://photos.app.goo.gl/wvx6XALc7bNxL6AaA

This is the first time this happened. I obviously let this spawn incubate for too long, as you can see from the mycelium growing up the walls of the bag, and the temperature went from constant 70F to 78 for at least probably a couple days towards the end. I only noticed this growth in 3 of 15 bags. What are the chances the others have it, but it is hidden? You're feedback will determine whether I will toss the rest of the lot or not. Thank you!

Jan 31 at 06:18 PM

Interesting thoughts on thickness of sub and using the bag without a tray